Filed under employment

Let’s End Degree Inflation


By 2020, 35 percent of the job openings will require at least a bachelor’s degree; 30 percent of the job openings will require some college or an associate’s degree; and 36 percent of the job openings will not require education beyond high school. That’s a big change in just one generation. Continue reading

Robots Get Fired for Low Performance


There’s new hope for those workers who are preparing to be replaced by robots (or managed by robot overlords.) A January 14 article in the Wall Street Journal reports that a Japanese hotel whose workforce consisted mainly of robots, has pulled the cord (so to speak) on the experiment. Continue reading

Ode on a Liberal Arts Graduate


For the record: I’m a proud liberal arts graduate. I graduated from the University of Wisconsin with big dreams and a double major that doesn’t have a darned thing to do with my work now. If you’re a parent despairing over your new grad’s choice of major, take heart. You could be the proud parent … Continue reading

Let’s Eliminate Employee Probation


“Probation” has a couple of meanings, including one from our criminal justice system. Its technical definition is “the release of an offender from detention, subject to a period of good behavior under supervision.” We also use it for newly hired employees, making their first few months feel like a presumption of incompetence until proven otherwise. Continue reading

Dressing for Confidence


Let’s face it; after you’ve been job searching for a while, your confidence takes a beating.  You may feel invisible; especially if your job search is mostly online, you may feel like no one knows you’re there.  It may be tempting to go for comfort over style when you do venture out.  After all, who cares what you wear to the grocery store, right? Continue reading

The Second Shift


Much has changed since the women’s movement in the 1970s, but one factor remains the same: women still work two shifts. One paid one at the office, and the other unpaid, performing most of the household and childcare tasks at home. Continue reading

Young Workers: Set your Career on FIRE


Most of us think of retirement age as somewhere between 62 (Social Security eligibility) and 70 (mandatory retirement age for some professions, and the age when Social Security payments max out.) But a wave of young people have decide life is too short to spend 50 years of it working. Continue reading