An Etiquette Quiz: Couth or Dare


My recent post on etiquette based on Laura Mathewson’s book Bottom Line: Manners Matter gave tips on how to make a great, mannerly impression. How much did you learn?  Take the quiz and find out.

 

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How etiquette savvy are you? Every ambitious careerist should know these things.

Introductions

  1. When introducing two people to each other, which of these is correct?
    1. Introduce the new arrival to the person who has been at the event longer
    2. Introduce the younger or more junior to the older or more senior person (“Mr. Green, I’d like you to meet the new intern in accounting, Joe.”)
    3. Introduce a man to a woman (“Mr. Smith, I’d like you to meet Ms. Jones.”)
  2. Who gets up from their chair for an introduction?
    1. Men only
    2. The junior person when meeting a senior person (in age or rank)
    3. Everyone

Table Manners

  1. When being served with a group of people, start eating when:
    1. You are served
    2. When you think the food might be getting cold
    3. When the senior person at the table begins to eat
    4. When the last person at the table is served
  2. On which side of the place setting is your water glass?
    1. Right
    2. Left
  3. Which way do you pass items at the table when they will be passed to everyone? (the bread basket, for example)
    1. To the right
    2. To the left
    3. Toward the most senior person at the table
    4. It doesn’t matter

Events

  1. You are invited to a social or after hours event, but can’t attend. What do you do?
    1. Ignore the invitation
    2. Say yes, because your schedule might change – you never know
    3. Ask if someone else from the company could go in your place
    4. RSVP that you can’t come
  2. When is the correct time to arrive at a social event?
    1. It’s best to get there a few minutes before the start time
    2. Up to five minutes after the start time
    3. Within the first 30 minutes
    4. Any time you arrive is okay – there will be plenty of other guests there, so it doesn’t matter if a few are late

 

Feeling good?  Here are the answers:

Introductions

  1. When introducing two people to each other, which of these is correct?
    1. Introduce the new arrival to the person who has been at the event longer
    2. Introduce the younger or more junior to the older or more senior person (“Mr. Green, I’d like you to meet the new intern in accounting, Joe.”)
    3. Introduce a man to a woman (“Mr. Smith, I’d like you to meet Ms. Jones.”)

Answer: All of the above. Generally, you introduce the younger or more junior to the older or more senior person, but when you’re not sure which is which, feel free to assume the seniority applies to the length of time you’ve been at the event, as well (as in “a”)

  1. Who gets up from their chair for an introduction?
    1. Men only
    2. The junior person when meeting a senior person (in age or rank)
    3. Everyone

Answer: C. Everyone should stand when being introduced.

Table Manners

  1. When being served with a group of people, start eating when:
    1. You are served
    2. When you think the food might be getting cold
    3. When the senior person at the table begins to eat
    4. When the last person at the table is served

Answer: C or D. If it’s a small table, you should wait for everyone to be served. If it’s a larger group, or everyone is served at once, wait for the senior person at the table to begin eating or signal that everyone should begin.

  1. On which side of the place setting is your water glass?
    1. Right
    2. Left

Answer: A. Your water glass is on your right.

  1. Which way do you pass items at the table when they will be passed to everyone? (the bread basket, for example)
    1. To the right
    2. To the left
    3. Toward the most senior person at the table
    4. It doesn’t matter

Answer: A. Everyone should pass to the right. If someone close to you asks for a specific item, pass it the shortest route his/her way, even if they are to your left.

Events

  1. You are invited to a social or after hours event, but can’t attend. What do you do?
    1. Ignore the invitation
    2. Say yes, because your schedule might change – you never know
    3. Ask if someone else from the company could go in your place
    4. RSVP that you can’t come

Answer: D. Hosts ask for RSVPs because they must plan for ordering food and beverages. If you ignore the invitation, the host must assume you never received it or have not yet made up your mind. That makes saying “yes” even more egregious, since they may have ordered food that won’t be eaten. You should never assume guests are welcome or that you could substitute someone in your place; it’s awkward for the host to say no. Just pick up the phone or send an email decline graciously. And do it as soon as you know for sure.

  1. When is the correct time to arrive at a social event?
    1. It’s best to get there a few minutes before the start time
    2. Up to five minutes after the start time
    3. Within the first 30 minutes
    4. Any time you arrive is okay – there will be plenty of other guests there, so it doesn’t matter if a few are late

Answer: B. Early is problematic, since the host may not be ready, but fashionably late is not at all cool. If you have any idea that a sit-down dinner will be served, you must arrive on time. It’s unspeakably rude to risk that the host’s meal could be overcooked or cold waiting on your sorry butt to arrive before seating the guests.

 

 

 

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